Grover Lab

 

Current Lab Members


Pulkit Grover, Principal Investigator pulkit@cmu.edu
Ph.D., Electrical Engineering & Computer Sciences, UC Berkeley, 2010
M.Tech, B.Tech., Electrical Engineering, IIT Kanpur, 2005, 2003


I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at CMU. I hold B.Tech. and M.Tech. degrees in electrical engineering from IIT Kanpur, and a Ph.D. from UC Berkeley supervised by Anant Sahai. I also spent 18 months at Stanford as a postdoc in Andrea Goldsmith's group.

I play tennis, love hiking, traveling, and doing creative and geeky artwork. When in India, I like to fight kite duals.





Yaoqing Yang, Grad Student yyaoqing@andrew.cmu.edu
Ph.D. candidate, ECE, CMU
B.S., EE, Tsinghua University, 2013

Recently I am focusing on my PhD research to explore the possibility of building reliable circuits out of noisy components. Promising schemes span coding, message passing and control on graphs. Before that I was studying the communication limitation in high-interference mobile networks. In the future there might be a chance to combine these two seemingly independent lines into general noisy computation.

I love travelling and hiking but I haven't been to Tibet which is my ultimate dream. In preparation, I exercise regularly. Other hobbies include reading comics and listening to light music.




Majid Mahzoon, Grad Studentmmahzoon@andrew.cmu.edu
Ph.D. candidate, ECE, CMU
B.S., Electrical Engineering, Sharif University

I am from Mashhad, Iran. I received my B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering, Communications, from Sharif University of Technology, the best technical school in my country. I have started my Ph.D. studies in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of Carnegie Mellon University from Fall 2013 under supervision of Professor Grover. During my undergrad studies, I got interested in Information Theory and its applications in various fields and did some research in related areas such as Implicit Communication, Cognitive Interference Channels, Interactive Channel Coding and Data Communication over the GSM Voice Channel. I am currently working on finding the fundamental limits of computation, specifically in the sorting problem, from an information-theoretic approach.

Our goal is to find energy-efficient solutions for computing different functions. When I am free, I enjoy playing and watching soccer and listening to music.



Ramon Cepeda Jr., MS Studentmailto:rcepeda@andrew.cmu.edu
MS Candidate, ECE CMU



I am working on a channel model in MATLAB that is up to par to the 802.11ad standard that would help us investigate the benefits of adaptability and reconfigurability to achieve total energy minimization of millimeter-wave communications links.

I like to run and play basketball. I was born in New York City. I am an 18 year old graduate student.





Ana Beisy Cruz, Undergradanabeisy_2008@hotmail.com
B.S. candidate, ECE, CMU, 2015

Over the past few decades, brain stimulation has been used to treat a variety of medical conditions. A few examples of such conditions are epileptic seizures and Parkinson's disease. In both cases, brain stimulation is used to lessen the effects of the disease and to improve the quality of life of the patient. My goal is to understand how the main brain stimulation devices in the market work and to find ways to improve them.

My hobbies include cliff jumping, blogging, drawing, and building a variety of things. I grew up in Dajabon, the Dominican Republic with more pets than I could count.





Max Regan, Undergradate Student mgregan@andrew.cmu.edu
B.S. candidate, ECE, CMU, 2015

I work in two areas. The first was creating a MATLAB model that could simulate a network of wireless power transmitters, receivers, and unpowered repeaters. I used it to examine and optimize power transfer efficiency. The second was design and test a proof-of-concept for detecting attackers of hardware circuits. This was done by detecting minute variations in magnetic fields caused by the presence of probes near the attacked circuit.

Born in Georgia, raised in Massachusetts and Kansas, living in North Carolina, and going to school in Pennsylvania, I'm from all over the US. When I'm free, I can be found hiking, programming, or playing rugby.





Rahshel Brown, Undergraduate studentrsbrown@andrew.cmu.edu
B.S. candidate, ECE, CMU, 2015


I am exploring the tradeoffs present when trying to use a single EM wave to transmit information and power.

I'm from Queens, New York. When I'm not working, I enjoy dancing and occasionally choreographing in the styles of hip hop and dancehall.



 

Previous Lab Members



Phillip Fynan, Summer intern (2013) psf3@students.calvin.edu
B.S. candidate, EE, Calvin College


I worked on research into green communications. Specifically, I worked on determining the power consumption of LDPC codes implemented in FPGAs and ASICs. Originally, I grew up in Santa Rosa, CA.

Outside of school, I play baroque and renaissance recorder.



Karthik Ganesan, Undergraduate student (2010-13) karthik3@stanford.edu
B.S., EE, UC Berkeley,
Ph.D. Candidate, Stanford University
I am interested in a variety of topics in coding theory, statistics, applied probability, and theoretical computer science. My current focus is in energy-efficient communication and robust computation. At Berkeley, I spent three years working with Pulkit, Yang Wen, and Professors Jan Rabaey and Andrea Goldsmith on energy consumed in decoding under various theoretical models of VLSI implementations, and then developed a large set of decoding power models based on post-layout circuit simulations. These models helped raise several code design questions, and allowing search of code + modulation + decoding combinations which are transmit + processing power-efficient for a variety of communication settings. I credit my involvement in the group as one of the most important parts of my education and a major source of motivation in pursuing graduate school.

I am originally from the Bay Area, CA. In my free time, I enjoy watching sports, hiking, listening to orchestral music, and attending symphony concerts.


Yang Wen, Undergraduate student (2011-12)
B.S., EE, UC Berkeley
Currently at Oracle Corporation
I worked on research about green communication. I designed Multi-bits LDPC (Low-Density Parity-Check) decoders using ST 90nm technology and investigated tradeoff among different decoders in terms of power, layout, timing and error probability. I built a model in MALTAB to demonstrate the relationship between decoders' power consumption with different bits of messages, girths, and degrees of variable nodes and check nodes.

My current work focuses on design of CPU for next-generation of high-performance servers.

I was born and raised in Tianjin, China. Outside of my work, I like biking, hiking and kayaking.